Transport

Transport


Our Vision

All Tasmanians can get to work, training, education, services, volunteering, social and recreational activities.

We can achieve this through:

  • More extensive, more frequent, more affordable public transport options for rural and regional Tasmanians as well as for people living in the major population centre, with extensive community involvement in design
  • More driver mentoring programs for people trying to get their licenses
  • Increased spending on public and active transport infrastructure, including bus stops, footpaths and bicycle paths.

All announcements


Labor


Policy

$5 mil over three years for integrated ticketing

$10 mil over ten years for interchange and bus stop infrastructure, real time apps and digital displays

$5 mil over ten years for suburban connector bus services

$6 mil over ten years for additional Metro fleet upgrades

$4 mil over ten years for better commuter services in Burnie and Launceston related to UTas expansion into CBDs

Improved bus services to Sorell and surrounds


Rating
Rating Justification

All of these measures meet key present and future needs. The proposal for suburban connector bus services is a particularly positive one, as many Tasmanians live farther than walking distance from main bus routes.

Liberal


Policy

Hobart Traffic Vision, with capital measures likely contingent on City Deal:

$100m (according to one press report) for a new Bus Transit Centre for Metro and other bus companies

$35m for a fifth express lane on Southern Outlet

Take over Davey and Macquarie Sts

Ferry service between Bellerive and Sullivans Cove

Bus priority measures on key routes into CBD

Traffic Incident Response Team

Establish Hobart Transport Master Plan


Rating
Rating Justification

The Bus Transit Centre, bus priority measures, and a new ferry service will make public transport in Hobart easier to use, but not necessarily more affordable. Congestion management measures similarly primarily benefit those who are able to drive—although bus services will also benefit, making public transport more attractive and viable.

Labor


Policy

$5 mil over two years for establishment of state-owned Passenger Transport Corporation (PTC) incorporating operations and function of Metro and DSG’s Passenger Transport Services. Board to include community group representatives.


Rating
Rating Justification

It’s not clear where the PTC model comes from or why it would be more effective than the establishment of a Mobility Manager with responsibility for bringing in not-for-profit services and other transport concerns.

Greens

 


Policy

Free travel on Metro buses for tertiary students, including university and TasTAFE students.


Rating
Rating Justification

Public transport costs can eat up a substantial proportion of the budget of a tertiary student who does not receive parental support. The policy would benefit, however, from inclusion of non-metropolitan General Access services for students living in areas that are effectively outer urban areas (New Norfolk, Dodges Ferry) but that do not have Metro services.

Greens


Policy

Address Hobart’s traffic congestion through:

  • Development of a Capital City Master Plan
  • Pursuit of a city deal including light rail, ferry, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure

Examination of Hobart’s future network needs, including heavy infrastructure (the Tasman Bridge).


Rating
Rating Justification

While sound planning, and potentially highly beneficial to Hobart residents, the plan does not address the needs of Tasmanians living outside Hobart.

Labor


Policy
  • Commitment of $10 million towards a staged plan to make Tasmania a leader in electric vehicle use, including:
  • Either $2.5 million or $3 million for infrastructure and technology for support (recharging stations).
  • $3.5 million previously allocated to Caterpillar in Burnie to establish pilot program to convert existing Metro busses to electricity.
  • $1.5 million to pilot roll-out of electric vehicles across the Government vehicle fleet.

Rating
Rating Justification

A shift to electric vehicles will not immediately benefit those on the lowest incomes unless a subsidy for purchase is introduced. However, a shift to electricity would overcome some of the petrol price disadvantage in rural areas, as the cost of electricity does not vary between cities and the regions. These benefits extend to potential share-car schemes.

Electric vehicles are booming elsewhere and clearly are a key future direction in transport. And climate change will have the greatest impact on those who can least afford it.

Labor


Policy

$9 mil for free primary and secondary student transport to nearest public or private school, “best aligned with family’s preference.” When student enrols in a school further than their nearest applicable option, full concession fare will apply.


Rating
Rating Justification

This proposal has the potential to benefit many low-income families. However, it may be necessary to create exceptions for a student who is, for instance, unable to attend their nearest school due to bullying. Ideally, this measure would be extended to tertiary education as well.

Labor


Policy

Allocation of $14 million for ‘make ready’ works on the Hobart rail corridor. Market testing to occur for potential operators. Safety upgrades to level crossings will be included and corridor will remain in public ownership. Integrated ticketing system with existing bus and potential future ferry services. Rezoning of rail corridor for medium-density housing, park and ride carparks, new commercial/office/retail development, recreation and education precincts.


Rating
Rating Justification

While all public transport options have the potential to benefit people facing transport disadvantage, a new passenger rail line will need to extend to Bridgewater to be truly equitable—something that is not clear from the announcement so far.

Liberal


Policy

A statewide common ticketing service for public passenger transport will permit riders to move between Metro and private bus services on a single ticket by 2019/20.


Rating
Rating Justification

Integrated ticketing will address a significant barrier particularly for rural Tasmanians who need to switch between private and Metro buses. This measure was first announced in the 2017/18 Budget, and so is not a new initiative.

Liberal


Policy

Bus services between Sorell and Hobart to be doubled, with buses departing every 30 minutes during peak times on week days and hours for the rest of the day. Saturday services will increase from 8 to 14 and 14 new Sunday services.

Services to Dodges Ferry/Carlton Beach, Richmond/Campania, and Bicheno/Coles Bay/Swansea to improve.

Services between New Norfolk and Hobart to increase by about a third, including on weekends.

Services to Margate to almost double, and Snug and Dover to get new weekend as well as more weekday services. Huonville to receive half-hourly services during weekday peak hours.


Rating
Rating Justification

These corridors have been under-serviced, given their expanding populations.  The proposed changes reflect the results of the Project 2018 bus service review.